Category Archives: Casino Host Evaluation

4 Steps to Strong Coaching from Managers

Here are 4 Steps to Strong Coaching from Managers.

  • Are you a Manager? Ask yourself ‘Do I take these Steps?’ and then file this away for when you need it.
  • Are a Host or Executive? If you are a real go-getter then you are hungry for this kind of feedback. Or, if you suspect that you are on ‘thin-ice’ with your manager, then suggest these steps to get their actual opinion of you, and to engage them in proactively coaching you.

This program takes you through the detailed steps of addressing and improving performance:

Step 1 – Prepare a Clear Assessment

  • Is there a written job description that details the expectations of the job?
  • Is there a standard Annual Evaluation Form for your Property?
  • Set aside 30 minutes of quiet time to reflect on the Host’s soft skills:
    • Read through the Job Description and the Evaluation Criteria
    • Give the Host a ‘grade’ of ABC for each part of the Job Description and the Evaluation Criteria.
      • A = ‘Really good at this’
      • B = ‘Okay at this’
      • C = ‘Not good enough at this’
  • For the C’s, write down 3 specific examples of where the Host went wrong.
  • Are their written goals such as ‘Increase Theo by 10% over last quarter?”
    • If so, review the Host’s results.
    • Reflect on your assessment of the Host’s soft skills.
      • How can the Host meet/exceed their goals by working on their B’s and C’s?
  • Prepare your summary! Map out a conversation that runs like this:
    1. Here are some areas that are really strong for you!
    2. These are some areas that need improvement.
    3. So we have talked about your strengths, and some areas that you need to improve, and I am here for you. Moving forward, how about we do X and Y each month.

Step 2 – Set up a Meeting but Don’t Terrify Them!

Schedule an hour with the Host.

Make sure your email gives them some homework to do ahead of time, so they can sit and reflect beforehand.

  • Subject “Discuss your Results”
  • Hi Jackie, Let’s spend some time going over your Job Description (attached) and discuss what you do well, and where you could improve. This is an informal conversation to see where I can give you some pointers on how to succeed. Please read the Job Description ahead of time and think about what you do really well (A), what you do adequately (B), and where you think you can improve (C). You won’t be giving me your own score but I want you to have thought ahead of time about what you see as your strengths and your areas for improvement. PS. Great job on the event last night. Thanks!

Try not to freak them out with your email! You don’t want them to lose productivity as they fret about the meeting.

Step 3 – Meet and follow the Sandwich Method

Meet with the Host in calm quiet place, and run the meeting as the Sandwich Method.

What is the 3-step Sandwich Method for giving feedback?

  1. Start with something positive (bread)
  2. Cover the negatives (the meat!)
  3. Close with encouraging words (more bread)

Sometimes, managers will describe the bread as fluff, but it really isn’t.

To stay motivated, the Host needs to know where they are strong (first slice of bread), their challenges (the meat), and that you still believe in them (last slice of bread).

(Of course, you might be at the point where you don’t still believe in them! In which case, look further down at Corrective Action.)

You run through the conversation that you prepared earlier:

  1. Here are some areas that are really strong for you! (The A’s)
  2. These are some areas that need improvement. (The C’s)
  3. and, we have talked about your strengths, and some areas that you need to improve, and I am here for you. Moving forward, how about we discuss this when we meet each month?

‘As you cover each Job Skill, do not ask them what grade they gave themselves! That was just an exercise to get them thinking.

Describe the behavior as you see it, with a specific example.

Focus on the behavior and not what you suspect to be the reason:

  • You don’t talk to as many guests as necessary. Not – I think you’re scared/lazy/too busy with your phone.
  • Your appearance needs to improve with a sharper image. Not – I think you’re scruffy, and without taste in clothes.

Don’t ask them to agree to your assessment!

  • They don’t have to agree with you, they just have to listen carefully and then take steps to meet your expectations.
  • If they say, “Well, I don’t see it that way…‘, you say ‘The point here is that I see it this way, so you are going to have to work to change my perception“.

Finally, give the Host something in writing that summarizes the C’s. This can be as simple as this:

  • Jackie, we met on 3/19 to discuss your performance. I have asked you to focus on the following:
    • Make sure you talk to 40 guests a week.
    • Improve your image to be sharper and in line with the rest of the team.
    • Focus on 10 Inactive players to get them back on property.

Ask them to sign your copy, and put it in your folder.

Schedule another meeting in a month’s time to discuss their improvement.

Step 4 – Monitor and give Feedback

For the next 30-60 days, depending on how urgent the situation is, you monitor their behavior, and note specific examples.

  • Send ‘atta-boys’ for positive change. “Hey! Just a quick note to say congratulations on meeting your goals this week”
  • And send ‘Nahs’!  “Hey, we talked about your appearance and I was not impressed when I see your tie undone yesterday”.

I know from experience that it can seem like a large investment in time to meet regularly with each team member and go through this kind of process. But if you don’t, and you just wait until the Annual Review, then:

  1. You are at risk of the employee saying the dreaded words ‘This is new to me!  You’ve never mentioned it! How can you ding me for something that you never told me! I am going to HR”.
  2. Plus! One of your key roles as a manager, is to coach and grow your team.

Are You ‘Done” with this person?

If you ‘done’ with this person, then it is time to meet with your HR representative and find out the process for “Corrective Action” which usually includes verbal warnings, written warnings, and then dismissal.

If your Property doesn’t have a Correction Action process then consider the following steps so that you can protect yourself against a charge of unfair dismissal. You can also Google for Correction Action Process. Consult with your manager and make sure they are aware of what you are doing, and support your actions.

Make sure everything is written down, or in a printed email, and put into a physical folder along with dates.

Give verbal warnings such as ‘We have discussed your appearance. It is is not acceptable and you must improve it within 30 days or you risk disciplinary action that could result in termination’. Hand-write a note for your file that captures what you said, the date, the rough time, and the location. And what the employee said, if anything.

If the change is insufficient, then put the same words into writing. ‘We have discussed your appearance. I gave you a verbal warning on 3/19. I am now giving you a written warning that this is not acceptable and you must improve it within 10 days or you risk disciplinary action that could result in termination’.

And then, if the time comes, you are well-prepared to justify the termination, and you can feel good that you did everything that you could to help the employee.

In summary, your role as the manager is:

  • Be crystal clear about your expectations and whether they are being met.
  • Give the person a chance to change and succeed by being clear, being consistent, giving specifics, and providing immediate feedback.
  • Grow the talent that is on Property

And, not incur the expense of constantly bringing in new people, training them up on your Club and Amenities, and then moving them on because they did not ‘cut it’.

As always, let Jackie know if you have anything to add to this!

 

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Job Descriptions for Player Development

Here is a list of the most basic and important responsibilities in Player Development.

Feel free to copy, paste, and use these ideas in the Job Descriptions for your Player Development team. If we are missing anything, drop an email to jparker@harvesttrends.com

Summary of Responsibilities

The main responsibility of a Player Development professional, regardless of title, is to develop and maintain effective working relationships with a casino property’s very best players and provide services to them to build player loyalty and increase the number of visits or amount played (or both) from among those guests.

In order to do this, a PD pro must also develop and maintain strong working relationships with key allies throughout the property and in the community to ensure players have the experience they expect while gaming and to generate leads for new business.

Job Description for Casino Host, Executive Host, Player Development Executive

Here are the basic job functions in for everyone in Player Development (not necessarily in order of importance):

  • Establish and maintain positive customer relationships with players who meet property criteria (and with those identified to have the potential to reach that level of play)
  • Maintain contact with coded players as appropriate to generate return visits and provide exemplary service.
  • Interact with players in person on property, as well as via telephone, e-mail, text message, and written correspondence
  • Represent the property as a role model of customer service and professionalism
  • Effectively use out-bound phone-calls to keep contact with players that have not visited the property, and to market VIP parties and events.
  • Network among coded players to build relationships among the best customers and to generate leads for new high-worth players
  • Learn about and tailor services to guests’ preferences, likes and dislikes
  • Resolve player issues, whether real or perceived, to the guest’s satisfaction
  • Find the right balance in every situation between the guest’s desires and the property’s rules, regulations and guidelines  (There is always a way.)
  • Invite players to events, tournaments, shows, etc.,  according to their interests
  • Make hotel, show, dining and other reservations and communicate same to guest
  • Issue complimentaries or other offers to guests as play and property guidelines warrant
  • Host special events, player parties, property promotions and other activities as needed
  • Provide information to team and property leadership related to guest feedback, suggestions, concerns or issues
  • Maintain confidentiality of information about both customers and property; share carefully
  • Participate in brainstorming and planning sessions for Player Development program
  • Prepare and submit reports on activities as directed, complete and on time
  • Strive to achieve and exceed goals and metrics/objectives

Job Description for Player Development Manager

A Player Development Manager has 5 main responsibilities:

  • Grow the business; set and monitor achievement of goals and metrics for the team in alignment with the property’s business objectives.
  • Regularly review and re-code the players to focus the PD team on the highest potential.
  • Coach the hosts on how to improve their skills, grow their business, and meet their goals.
  • Resolve guest issues when they have to be escalated to management.
  • Manage the team, the budget, the reporting, and the logistics of events.

If you are a Player Development Manager (or other team leader) you are responsible for:

  • Setting SMART Goals and metrics for each host and for the team  (with a stretch!)
  • Monitoring pace toward goal achievement
  • Analysis of coded and potential high-worth player data
  • Assigning/coding players to hosts
  • Coaching staff as needed
  • Regular and consistent communication with all direct reports
  • Preparing and submitting activity and departmental reports as assigned
  • Attending meetings as a representative of the Player Development team
  • Participating in brainstorming and planning sessions for marketing
  • Implementing programs, events, promotions, etc. for the Player Development team
  • Providing assistance for marketing events as required
  • Resolving player issues, real or perceived, when host is unable to do so
  • Setting an example of excellent customer service

Why do casinos need player development?

I’ll bet your property sends out a lot of mail. Tons of it.  Right? I remember when I was on the seed list at my last property, and it seemed like I got a LOT of mail…and that was just the stuff from my own property!  The mailers I got from checking out the competition weren’t as numerous, since I wasn’t a high roller, but I got a pretty fair number of those, too.

There is a lot of e-mail communication, too. I get something at least once a month, even from properties I haven’t visited in some time. So I know casinos are reaching out and doing database marketing; in fact, I believe casinos do this better than many other businesses today. There’s certainly room for improvement, particularly in terms of “if this, then that” marketing, but that’s another blog post…

Casinos do a lot of things to bring players through their doors.  They post giant luxury cars onto multiple billboards, radio ads let patrons know who is going to be in the showroom soon (and more billboards sport the same message), postcards alert tier card holders there’s a continuity gift program for the upcoming holiday, and reservations agents are scheduled overtime to book the hotel once the coupons arrive in mailboxes market-wide. There’s clearly a lot going on to provide incentives for players to visit a particular casino.

Events are held, show tickets are handed out, food is served, prizes are awarded, and guests show up. So, why do casinos need player development?

Casinos need a true-to-life player development department because it can generate revenue the programs and activities above don’t get for them.  Sure, a player who has had a “pretty alright” experience at your property in the past may come in if you dangle the right prize or giveaway or food coupons at them. But to get the right ones to come in more often, there’s nothing like the personal touch.

A host can make it easier and more inviting for a player to return to a particular property than any other service you can offer.  A host can simply provide the final push a patron needs to commit to the trip your coupons got them to consider.  A host can find out whether a particular guest enjoys tournaments and invite them. A host can let them know when it looks like their favorite progressive is about to hit. A host can get them to share the tale of their bad experience and convince them to give your property another chance to get it right.

There are any number of ways to get a player to come to your casino for a visit, but there is nothing quite as effective as a casino host when it comes to bringing back players or potential worth.  These players expect more than coupons and promotions as a “reward” for their patronage.  Many of them know they are worth a lot to you and expect to be treated as such. Targeting new players who aren’t yet loyal, finding players who are at risk of defection, and reaching out to those you have already lost are cost-effective ways to boost revenue, and there’s no one better than a host to bring them back to you. A well-trained and equipped host team can drive revenue that will have a significant effect on your property’s bottom line.

If you aren’t sure where to start, or if your team needs additional tools or resources, find a PD partner who can show you how to refocus your host team and target the right potential players in your database.  You’ll be pleased with the results.

 

This post is brought to you by Harvest Trends. We specialize in Player Development (PD). Please take a look at PowerHost, a comprehensive way to drive revenue from your team of Casino Hosts and Player Development Executives. Or contact Paul Cutler at 561.860.2621 or pcutler@harvesttrends.com.  Paul will overnight you an informative package along with pricing.

What do I do about the underperforming hosts on my team?

When looking at your host team’s performance, no matter how often, you are looking at the same kinds of things, such as theo generated, player recency, frequency, incline or decline of play, reinvestment, exceptional comps, profitability, contacts, and events support. Hopefully you and your team can see these numbers on a regular basis so you always know how you’re doing. (You can certainly use monthly numbers to tell how well your team and the individuals on it are performing. More often is better.)

Often, the results are sort of a mixed bag. Some are ahead of pace for theoretical, but behind in reactivation or acquisition goals. Others are bringing people in, but those folks aren’t playing as expected, so the host is behind in generation of theoretical revenue. This can even happen while the property itself is performing well, depending in large part on the level of the host’s efforts.

So what can you do about it? First, check your program for opportunities to underperform. Most important of all, please give your hosts measurable goals. (It doesn’t have to be complicated, though it certainly can be.) Start with contact goals: make XX phone calls, mail XX letters, speak on the gaming floor with XX players every week. This single objective set means your expectations have been outlined and can be measured, so your hosts will know what you have assigned to them to do each day. You can, of course, give each host or the team a theoretical revenue target to reach, and/or you can set achievement numbers around separate functions such as new player acquisition, list growth, maintenance and reactivation. Setting measurable and achievable goals sends a message to the hosts to tell them how to be successful in their jobs. (This works best if you’ve aligned your team’s targets with the overall trajectory of your property’s marketing programs.)

Once you’ve set and communicated goals to the hosts, you have to measure the results in order to provide them feedback for improvement. Document everything. Have them sign the goals when they are communicated, and regularly share results in team or one-on-one meetings. Schedule these sharing sessions for two days after you receive results, whenever that is. This keeps you accountable. In the meetings, provide suggestions for ways to build relationships and follow up on opportunities, ensure they understand the guidelines and tools provided to them, and hold them accountable for their performance. This includes both praise for pacing well, achieving goals, and exceeding expectations as well as proper coaching and discipline in accordance with your property’s rules when they don’t do as well as they should.sittogether

If you’ve looked at your program and found other opportunities for your hosts to underperform, make a list and determine how you will turn things around. Do you have hosts who love to hug the usual suspects but don’t make a lot of phone calls? Communicate a specific number of hours each shift you expect them to actively make outgoing phone calls, then hold them to it. Are there hosts who spend all day on the phone but never hit the gaming floor and talk with patrons? Set a specific number of interactions to be reported to you along with the location on the gaming floor where they spoke with that guest. Do you have someone who seems as though his or heart just isn’t in it anymore? Have a frank conversation about why they have this job and come up with a plan to help them re-engage, or find a way for them to gracefully move on to greener pastures. Alternatively, you could even follow up with guests to verify that they are talking with and satisfied with their host.

Do all of you have all the tools you need to set, measure, communicate, and target goals? If not, resources are available in many forms. A number of technology partners can slice and dice the data for you and help you find the opportunities already in your database. (This is true of the entire database, not just those patrons whose play warrants a host’s attention, by the way.) Use a CRM to provide continuity of contacts, preferences and play history in an ever-changing world. Use analytics to target the right patrons, and you might even use your Casino Management System to code and track play from hosted payers. You’ll also need reporting to show how many contacts have been made, which players have been in, who redeemed what, and what that all means for your host team and your property. Mostly, you have to ensure a steady stream of information about what your hosts and their players are doing in order to keep things on track and make changes when they’re not.

What are some of the specific things you can do to help an underperforming host do a better job? The first thing to do is ensure understanding of the tasks and responsibilities of the role. Start on the same page and check in regularly to stay there. Then, once a week or more, make quick notes about the hosts’ performance. It only needs to be a couple of sentences, but note things like whether you saw her going over and above, if his milestones are consistently being reached or not, and add your thoughts on the numbers in the goal period to date. This is also a good place to compile tardiness, absences or extra work hours, patron feedback you’ve received, time management concerns, strengths or weaknesses (and how they’ve progressed or not), and other measurable data specific to that host’s performance. Then once a month, sit down with each host and share your thoughts on the work history you’ve now compiled over the course of the last few weeks. Doing this ensures you are looking at the data and providing the hosts with the necessary feedback, coaching and support they need to be more successful.

When you’ve done all this and the host just isn’t achieving all he should, it’s time to have another frank conversation about the host’s future. It’s critical, especially at this stage and in this situation, that you document everything. Have the host sign documentation related to your expectations, any special arrangements you have agreed upon, milestones and dates for follow-up, and all the steps that have been taken by both of you to rectify the situation to date. Then keep detailed notes along the way. If expectations aren’t being met after all this, it is probably time to make a change.

It’s never easy to let someone go, but when it opens the door for another person who really wants to do the job, it is likely to make the team stronger in the long run. The effects of having a coworker who isn’t pulling his weight can be devastating to your team. Resentment, rumors, and a general malaise can set in and undermine everything you need your host team to be: courteous to a fault, responsive, and cooperative. Hosts who are frustrated with a co-worker are stuck in what they see as a no-win situation. It’s tough to stay motivated and present a happy face to your guests when you’re feelings about work are uncharitable. Whatever the specific issue, the hosts who are performing will appreciate that you held an underperformer accountable and those who are on the fence will understand that you expect performance at a higher level.

What if you could build and measure your DREAM PD Program?

Have you ever taken the time to sit back and really daydream about what you would do in your PD program if there were no constraints? If you could have the answer to any question you have about your host team’s work, their player lists, their productivity, and what the team is actually doing for your bottom line, what would you build?

Having spent nearly 18 years in Casino Player Development, working as an ambassador, host, promotions administrator, tournament official, club manager, and finally director of many things marketing, I know “the struggle is real”. I remember having to practically beg the database guy to run a list for me, then I’d have to spend hours combing through it to kick out the one-trip wonders,remove the folks I knew had passed away since the last list build, plus I had to try to remember which players had relationships with which host…AAAAAHHHHHH!!!!

The best marketer I ever worked for challenged me to run my PD program based on what the analysis told me. And while I certainly saw the sense in the suggestion, I had no way to truly analyse the program in order to do what this challenge laid out. We had two database gurus, and they were always too busy to help me. Director or not, my requests always ended up in line behind (all things) direct mail, promotion analysis, ad hoc reports requested by finance or the GM, and nearly everything else these busy guys did every day. Without the occasional fulfilled request for something I could update and run for myself (usually excel riddled with macros and connected to a backup database so we didn’t take down the casino floor by running a report), I was flying nearly blind and spending an inordinate amount of time trying to get answers to my many questions.

But that was then: olden times, as the youngsters say. (You know, before phones were handheld computers…) Now things are different.

What if you could easily ensure that the players coded to your hosts were worthy of that honor? Then, what if you could determine how many other players were in need of a host’s service and could round-robin assign them with a few clicks or by sending an e-mail?

What if you could set daily or weekly tasks that rolled up into monthly or quarterly goals? How about being able to see some progress to goals in real time, and getting a full update every single day? What would you think if the hosts received the same update every day so they could self-correct and make adjustments to achieve their goals in a proactive way?

What if someone told you that all of this (and more) are possible without the need to ask your IT or database teams for assistance every time you have a question? What if you could find these answers for yourself with just a few clicks?

What if your hosts could enter a player contact on the fly or update preferences while they are on the phone so you could personalize the offers that go out to your best and most loyal patrons? Better yet, what if you could see in real time how your hosts are progressing to achieving the goals and objectives you’ve assigned to them?

Wanna hear the best part? You can have all this (and more!) without having to purchase expensive hardware or software. It’s a service that can be completely automated, and it’s available for an affordable monthly fee per user. We’re talking hundreds, not many thousands of dollars. Plus, there’s no contractual obligation, no long-term commitment, and no risk.

It is possible to build the Player Development program of your dreams. It’s also possible to monitor, measure and report on the results of that program.

How does a casino host find good players?

When I started my gaming career, I was first hired as a casino host. In those days, we mostly walked around the gaming floor looking for quality players we could sign up for the players club and chatted up the guests in the high limit areas. Later, when we began mining the database to identify better players and assign them to the hosts, the Player Development function turned into more of a phone-based activity. The evolution of the Player Development program is still going strong, and I believe we need to land somewhere in the middle of these two activity types in order to be most effective.

Today, many casino hosts have lists provided to them by the database team, so they work their way through phone calls and mailing lists, often never meeting their players in person until they’ve communicated a handful of times. Some hosts have worked in PD for a number of years and have developed their own “book of business” – hard-won high-level players who call when they want to gamble. A handful of these hosts are independent operators, who can send their players to any number of casinos instead of representing just one property. It is my belief that any good casino host will understand (or seek to learn) how to “cut in” to a good player, establish a rapport, and move away from dependency on the database team to build his or her book of business.

So, how does that work? How will I find these mythical “good players”? How will I know whether they’re really worth my time? I have provided a few of the best places to look below.

  1. Go to the busiest slots areas on the gaming floor and talk with the players there.  See who has your property’s highest players club tier, watch the action as you visit, take some names and look those folks up to see how consistently they play well.
  2. Talk to the slot attendants and see who they recommend you meet.  They’re not always right, but they know who sits at a machine feeding it all day and they can tell you who you missed.
  3. Make friends with table games shift/floor supervisors.  They can quickly tell you who bought in for big money and where those players are now if they’re still in house.  Want to know who blew a lot of cash in a hurry?  Because these important and busy employees have to do the paperwork related to the biggest losers, they should be able to at least give you a name.
  4. Ask your guests for leads.  Birds of a feather do flock together, so talk to your best players and give them incentives to invite their gambling friends to your property.  Buying a round of buffets for 4 doesn’t cost very much and it makes your current player look important to their friends.  If the play is good enough, make it the steakhouse instead…and everybody shines.
  5. Learn what affinity groups are near your property and find ways to introduce yourself.  Do you host mostly table games players?  Hit the links and distribute your business cards, because many golfers also love to play casino table games.  Do you mostly handle slot players?  Find the local bingo parlor and grab a dauber, because you can learn which bingo enthusiasts go to what property while you play.  Do you have lots of guests from one particular ethnic group?  Do some research and find the community gathering place for that nationality, then offer to speak or distribute casino merchandise at a get-together.

Just like any other sales function, networking is essential to the casino hosts’ ability to build a stronger list of players and/or a book of business.  Finding players with high potential can be a challenge, but developing this skill will make you a more valuable employee and help you achieve your theoretical targets.

Do you have successful tactics to add?  Please feel free to comment!

7 Keys to Evaluating a Casino Host’s Performance

As the end of the year approaches, it is time to reflect on the year past…and for many of us, it is time to begin writing evaluations. It does not have to be a daunting prospect. Two things need to be addressed, however, before we get started.

  1. Use concrete examples whenever possible to back up what you write in the evaluation.  Even if you don’t include them in the document, make note of the examples and use them when you discuss the evaluation with the host. Anecdotes help you make a point in a clear and concise manner.
  2. Nothing in the evaluation should be a surprise to the host. If you’re going to drop a bombshell on someone, this is not the right time. Be honest, but don’t be brutal.

Use the following 7 areas of performance to evaluate whether your hosts are doing well or not, and use the evaluation process as a starting point for coaching to improve the performance of those hosts who are not meeting your expectations. Rate each host in every attribute and make notes to back up each rating.

Accountability: A host who is accountable is one who takes ownership of his role and understands how it contributes to the property’s success. The accountable host handles his responsibilities and knows where he stands in terms of his performance. What negatives should you look for? “Lost” reservations, difficulty locating the host while on shift, guests who say calls were never returned, incomplete tasks, and similar dropped balls.

Contribution: An individual makes a contribution to a team by providing candid and constructive feedback to team leaders and co-workers in the spirit of continuous improvement. Did your players like the ice cream social party you had? If not, what should you have done instead? A host who is contributing to the team’s success would have shared with you what her players said about it. She also might have told you about the shortcut she found in your player tracking system and she may even have suggested coming in an hour early tomorrow to show the ambassadors how to set up for tournament registration.

Collaboration: Hosts need collaboration to be successful. From getting timely hotel reservations to setting up birthday celebrations, hosts need to establish and nurture working relationships across the enterprise to effectively meet both guest needs and property objectives. Leveraging relationships with dealers, slot attendants, steakhouse servers, reservations agents and valet attendants enables a host to provide the absolute best experience for their players. Ask the host who her go-to person is in each department on property to understand how collaborative she is.

Communication: It is of vital importance that hosts understand what needs to be shared with whom, and in what venue. Ensuring that the flow of information follows established guidelines to protect private and proprietary data is one of the most critical security concerns hosts have. Beware the over-sharer or, alternatively, the host who rarely has anything to add to a conversation.

Results: A results-oriented host is one who achieves individual and team goals the majority of the time and focuses on results instead of efforts. Here, you’re looking for a performer who can tell you whether or not he is on pace to reach a goal, how much theo his players drive on a typical Wednesday, and what he is doing to surpass his goal. A host who is not results-oriented will tell you how many people he was unable to reach when he was making calls and often offers up excuses instead of plans when he is off pace.

HostGoals

Guest Service: This seems like a no-brainer, but it needs to be addressed because of its importance to Player Development. When in front of a guest, the host should be able to focus on that guest as though he or she is the only person in the world regardless of what is going on around them. A host should always follow up on guest requests in a timely manner and should provide the same level of courtesy to his collaborators around the property. Think of more than one anecdote to back up your score in this area, because there is always room for improving one’s guest service.

Strengths and Areas for Growth: To demonstrate your understanding of each host as an individual contributor to the department, include a short list of that host’s strengths as well as areas in which there is a need for improvement. Think of it sort of like a lawyer’s closing argument. Present to the host a quick but comprehensive picture of your view to his overall performance. Doing this establishes that you have been paying attention to the host’s work and that you know him.

Now that you’ve written some scores and anecdotes for each of the attributes, set aside the evaluation. Review it in a couple of days and make any adjustments you deem necessary, then complete the review process according to your property’s practices. Keep in mind that you should be setting the example for your team, so you may want to evaluate your own performance using the same 7 attributes.  Happy evaluating!